September72014
December252012
September42012
theogonic-symphonic-tragedy:

Celtic Mythology The GWRAGEDD ANNWN [wives of the underworld]were lake-sirens in Wales. These lovely creatures are known to choose mortal men as their husbands. One legend has it that they live in a sunken city in one of the many lakes in Wales. People claim to have seen towers under water and heard the chiming of bells. In earlier times, there used to be a door in a rock and those who dared enter through it came into a beautiful garden situated on an island in the middle of a lake. In this garden there were luscious fruits, beautiful flowers and the loveliest music, besides many other wonders. Those brave enough to enter were welcomed by the Gwragedd Annwn and were invited to stay as long as they wanted, on the condition that they never took anything back from the garden. One visitor ignored the rule and took a flower home with him. As soon as he left the island, the flower disappeared and he fell unconscious to the ground. From that day on, the door has been firmly closed and none has ever passed through it again. Hugh R. Akehunt.

theogonic-symphonic-tragedy:

Celtic Mythology The GWRAGEDD ANNWN [wives of the underworld]were lake-sirens in Wales. These lovely creatures are known to choose mortal men as their husbands. One legend has it that they live in a sunken city in one of the many lakes in Wales. People claim to have seen towers under water and heard the chiming of bells. In earlier times, there used to be a door in a rock and those who dared enter through it came into a beautiful garden situated on an island in the middle of a lake. In this garden there were luscious fruits, beautiful flowers and the loveliest music, besides many other wonders. Those brave enough to enter were welcomed by the Gwragedd Annwn and were invited to stay as long as they wanted, on the condition that they never took anything back from the garden. One visitor ignored the rule and took a flower home with him. As soon as he left the island, the flower disappeared and he fell unconscious to the ground. From that day on, the door has been firmly closed and none has ever passed through it again.

Hugh R. Akehunt.

(via akatriel-rowanborn)

August312012
victoriousvocabulary:

DIANA
[noun]
Roman mythology: literally “heavenly” or “divine” - the goddess of the hunt and moon and birthing, being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. She was equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, though she had an independent origin in Italy. Diana was worshipped in ancient Roman religion and is revered in Roman Neopaganism and Stregheria. She was one of the three maiden goddesses, Diana, Minerva and Vesta, who swore never to marry.

victoriousvocabulary:

DIANA

[noun]

Roman mythologyliterally “heavenly” or “divine” - the goddess of the hunt and moon and birthing, being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. She was equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, though she had an independent origin in Italy. Diana was worshipped in ancient Roman religion and is revered in Roman Neopaganism and Stregheria. She was one of the three maiden goddesses, Diana, Minerva and Vesta, who swore never to marry.

August232012
victoriousvocabulary:

VESTA
[noun]
Roman mythology: the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman religion. Vesta’s presence is symbolised by the sacred fire that burned at her hearth and temples. Her closest Greek equivalent is Hestia.

victoriousvocabulary:

VESTA

[noun]

Roman mythology: the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman religion. Vesta’s presence is symbolised by the sacred fire that burned at her hearth and temples. Her closest Greek equivalent is Hestia.

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